The New Zealand Truck Loading Code

Allquip Hire & Sales

The New Zealand Truck Loading Code was issued by transport authorities after consultation with other governments and government departments and with New Zealand industry organisations. The Official New Zealand Truck Loading Code is a code of practice for the safety of loads on heavy vehicles. The following is from the first page of the truck loading code.

“The Truck Loading Code sets out a code of practice for the safety of loads on heavy vehicles.
 
It has been prepared to provide owners, drivers, operators and loading staff with guidance in  the basic safety principles that must be followed generally, and in particular the precautions  that must be taken to ensure the safe carriage of a number of the more  common types of  load, including containers, pallets, construction equipment, logs and sawn timber.”

Truckers should take note of the ratings of lashing equipment in the  New Zealand Truck Loading Code.

Many items for sale in New Zealand are made to Australian Standard and are marked with a Lashing Capacity. That lashing capacity is not necessarily the rated strength under the New Zealand Truck Loading Code.

Chain is rated at its minimum breaking load in the New Zealand Truck Loading Code (refer paragraph 1, page 10) while the Australian Lashing Capacity is only 50% of the breaking load. The Australian rules calculate the lashing requirements by a more complex method, but the result is essentially the same number of chains on a given load.

Under Australian rules, a 2500kg tie down can be rated at double the lashing capacity when used in an upside-down basket configuration. Under the New Zealand Truck Loading Code this does not apply, and a 2500kg tie down is always rated at 2500kg.

Every person who carries loads should be familiar with the New Zealand Truck Loading Code. The penalties for losing a load are severe and the consequences are the possible loss of life.

Click here for  The Official New Zealand Truck Loading Code

This edition published 2012 by the NZTA,